KIM COPELAND PRODUCTIONS BLOG: Preparing For Your CD Photo Shoot By Moments By Moser Photography


Preparing For Your CD Photo Shoot
as published in KIM COPELAND PRODUCTIONS BLOG
(http://kimcopelandproductions.com/home/blog/)

 

KCPartner Bev Moser Photo
KCPartner
Bev Moser
The more people I photograph, the more I’ve come to realize something: a great portrait is a collaboration between photographer and subject. When both are working together the result is far more than what comes from direction alone. Our subjects often aren’t experienced in having their photo taken, and don’t know a lot about the process.
The number one thing I always start out with when I meet a new client is to explain my style and what to expect from me and what I expect from them; as well as any others they may have with them, as many have spouses, management team, wardrobe stylists, hair and makeup team etc. I encourage them to be themselves… talk, move, and most importantly, relax and have fun! The shoot is often quite nerve wracking for folks, so the more information I can give them the more comfortable and confident they’ll feel.
Below are the top five things to keep in mind as you make your plans:
  1. What are photos to be used for?

    1. Headshots for business and promotion?
    2. Family photography for framing and enlargement?
    3. Live performance photography?
    4. Websites for social media and / or business?
There are countless uses, but know what your end results “could be” this makes a world of difference on the “look” we will encourage out of you to achieve the goals.
  1. Do you have a location in mind or examples of others you like?

    1. Do not ever hesitate to share ideas of looks you like – just like a haircut you see in a magazine, yours will never be “exactly” like the one you saw, but we strive to give you the feel and style with personalization to make it uniquely you!
    2. We will gladly help “scout” a location for you and chances are we have some in mind but knowing item one will give us a lot of ideas on what might works best to achieve what you want the photographs for.
  1. Are you planning on using props?

    (guitars, hats, special items to compliment the location or the reason for the photograph)
    1. We strongly encourage you to have items in your photographs to make them more “you” and more “personal”… and if you are using the photographs for a promotional reason, regardless if it is just you or for your business, is there a tie in or theme you need to keep in mind or something you can bring along that might really bring a special meaning to the photo?
    2. Discuss and show us the props you have and what they mean to you. Are you wanting the prop to be something you are singing about on the title cut of your CD? Did the item belong to someone special to you? The more we know, the more creative we will be able to be.
  1. Clothing for photos

    1. Think ahead on what you want to wear. It is usually one of the biggest challenges. But laying out your clothes and including all accessories, shoes, socks, hats, whatever you need and packing it accordingly will ensure you are photo ready.
    2. How many different looks are you hoping to photograph – we love it when we have more to work with than one outfit… different colors and textures create a new you, and a new feel.
  1. Keeping all the above in mind, give yourself time to achieve all you hope to capture.

    1. Rushing and squeezing too much into a short session will only frustrate you. You know how much you enjoy getting photos taken – so keep in mind your tolerance level as well – if you are not wanting to be there, it will show. We want happy customers. Some individuals will stay all day, all week! They love posing, changing looks… and that is not easy either… so set a goal on a time frame as this helps everyone achieve the best session possible. 

    Website: Moments By Moser Photography

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/MomentsByMoser

MusicRow Magazine: Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne Receive ‘MusicRow’ No. 1 Challenge Coins


• January 15, 2016 • 
Pictured (L-R): Troy Stephenson, Shane McAnally. Photo: Moments by Moser
Pictured (L-R): Troy Stephenson, Shane McAnally. Photo: Moments by Moser

Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne each accepted their latest MusicRow No. 1 Challenge Coins this week at the office of SMACK Songs.
MusicRow CountryBreakout Chart Director Troy Stephenson presented the coins, which are earned by artists and songwriters when their single reaches No. 1 on the chart.
McAnally’s latest coin is for his writing credit on Brothers Osborne’s “Stay A Little Longer.”

Pictured (L-R): Troy Stephenson, Josh Osborne. Photo: Moments by Moser
Pictured (L-R): Troy Stephenson, Josh Osborne. Photo: Moments by Moser

Meanwhile, Osborne earned his latest coin for Tim McGraw’s “Top Of The World.”
McAnally and Osborne each earned five No. 1 singles on the MusicRow CountryBreakout Chart in 2015.
They are also frequent collaborators, with shared credits on songs like Kenny Chesney’s “Wild Child,” Sam Hunt’s “Take Your Time,” and Keith Urban’s “John Cougar, John Deere, John 3:16.”
See the list of No. 1 Challenge Coins.

MusicRow Magazine: Big & Rich Celebrate Back-To-Back Top 10 Hits With Nashville Party

• January 13, 2016 • 
 
Big & Rich Records Celebrates two Back-To-Back Top 10s and more!Mt Richmore Nashville, TN1.12.16 Photo By Bev Moser *Moments by Moser
Pictured (Front Row, L-R): John Rich, Big Kenny. (Back Row, L-R): Ron Cerrito, Mike Nobrega, Whitney Daane, Jeff Solima, Rob Dalton.

New Revolution Records’ Big & Rich threw a party at Mt. Richmore (John Rich’s house) last night (Jan. 12) to celebrate back-to-back Top 10 hits with “Look At You” and “Run Away With You.” And as a bonus, they recently saw the most first week adds in their career for the current single, “Lovin’ Lately,” featuring Tim McGraw.
The event was held on level three of Rich’s home. It featured a full bar, stage, and big screen TV that was showing music videos from Big & Rich, Gretchen Wilson, and Jason Aldean. All of the songs were co-written by John Rich or Big Kenny.
Marc Oswald, who handles the manger role for Big & Rich, welcomed the crowd before introducing members of BMI, ASCAP, New Revolution, and Kobalt Music Publishing.
Big Kenny took the mic to preach about how “this team has been grinding for years and is on a constant voyage.”
Rich shared the story of meeting Big Kenny at a showcase for the first time and getting hit in the face by a piece of candy that Kenny had thrown the stage. “We decided to write together and had a song on our first meeting. And since then, we have written over 500 songs together,” said Rich.
Many familiar faces were present including Tim McGraw, Michael Ray, and legendary news journalist Dan Rather.

All photos courtesy of Bev Moser/Moments By Moser.
Pictured (L-R): John Rich, x, Jody Williams, Big Kenny.
Pictured (L-R): John Rich, Michael Martin (ASCAP), Jody Williams (BMI), Big Kenny.
View of Nashville from Mt. Richmore.
View of Nashville from Mt. Richmore.
Big & Rich Records Celebrates two Back-To-Back Top 10s and more!Mt Richmore Nashville, TN1.12.16 Photo By Bev Moser *Moments by Moser

MusicRow Magazine: Nashville Songwriting Exhibit Opens in Music City Center


• January 4, 2016 •
Pictured (Standing, L-R): Bill Anderson, Tom Douglas, Richard Leigh, and Pat Alger. (Seated, L-R): Dickey Lee, Bobby Braddock and Allen Shamblin. Photo: Bev Moser
Pictured (Standing, L-R): Bill Anderson, Tom Douglas, Richard Leigh, and Pat Alger. (Seated, L-R): Dickey Lee, Bobby Braddock and Allen Shamblin. Photo: Bev Moser

The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame (NaSHOF) has opened a new exhibit in its gallery located in Nashville’s Music City Center. Titled “The Evolution of a Great Song,” the exhibit features memorabilia and lyric drafts from Hall of Fame members Bill Anderson, Bobby Braddock, Paul Craft, Tom Douglas, Dallas Frazier, Dickey Lee, Richard Leigh, Layng Martine Jr., Hugh Prestwood, Curly Putman, Johnny Russell, Allen Shamblin and Hank Williams.
“Like anyone else who drops by to view our new exhibit, I was fascinated to see the creative process as it developed in manuscript form of some of my favorite songs,” said Pat Alger, Board Chair of the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, and himself a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. “Lyrics that seem so perfect when we heard the finished product often took a long and winding journey to get there. Every fan of songwriting will be interested in this display.”
“We wanted to give visitors insight into what a song looks like when the idea is first born and put to paper, long before it gets on the radio, when the writer has no idea whether the song will be successfully completed, let alone a hit,” said Layng Martine Jr., who is also a NaSHOF Board member.
The exhibit is located in the Hall of Fame Gallery on the first floor of the Music City Center. In addition to the new exhibit, the gallery features interactive touch screens that allow visitors to access audio, video and other digital information about the history of Nashville songwriting and members of the Hall of Fame.

SESAC Signs Songwriter/Producer Dave Pittenger


• January 7, 2016 •
Pictured (L-R): Magic Mustang Publishing’s Juli Newton-Griffith, Pittenger and SESAC’s Shannan Hatch. Photo: Bev Moser/Moments By Moser
Pictured (L-R): Magic Mustang Publishing’s Juli Newton-Griffith, Pittenger and SESAC’s Shannan Hatch. Photo: Bev Moser/Moments By Moser

Songwriter/producer Dave Pittenger has signed with SESAC for representation.
Pittenger, who co-wrote Tyler Farr’s “Better In Boots,” is signed with Magic Mustang Publishing, and stopped by SESAC’s Nashville office to visit with executives and make the partnership official.

The Tennessean: Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame has new exhibit

Ask anyone on Music Row: No two songs have the same journey. Some of the greatest tunes in history poured out of their authors in a matter of minutes. Other songs took years of tweaking to get just right.
The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame will bring the public into that creative process in a new exhibit, "The Evolution of a Great Song." The exhibit is part of the Hall of Fame's gallery at Nashville's Music City Center, and will give visitors a close-up look at some early drafts, manuscripts and memorabilia from a dozen of the Hall's esteemed members.
Bill Anderson, Bobby Braddock, Tom Douglas, Dallas Frazier, Dickey Lee, Richard Leigh, Layng Martine Jr., Hugh Prestwood, Curly Putman and Allen Shamblin have all contributed pieces to the exhibit, which also features items from the late Paul Craft, Johnny Russell and Hank Williams.
“We wanted to give visitors insight into what a song looks like when the idea is first born and put to paper, long before it gets on the radio,” Martine said.
The Hall of Fame Gallery can be found on the first floor of Music City Center (at the corner of Demonbreun Street and Sixth Avenue South). The gallery is free and open to the public most days, depending on the center's event schedule.

MusicRow Magazine: Bobby Karl Works Leadership Music Dale Franklin Awards


• November 17, 2015 • 
 
Leadership Music Dale Franklin Awards. Pictured (L-R): Debbie Linn, Leadership Music; Reba, Steve Buchanan, and Jo Walker-Meador, honorees; Nashville Mayor Megan Barry; Mike Craft, Leadership Music.
Leadership Music Dale Franklin Awards. Pictured (L-R): Debbie Linn, Leadership Music; Reba, Steve Buchanan, and Jo Walker-Meador, honorees; Nashville Mayor Megan Barry; Mike Craft, Leadership Music. Photo: Bev Moser/Moments By Moser

BOBBY KARL WORKS THE ROOM
Chapter 517
In the fall of 1975, Reba McEntire launched her phenomenal country music career, Steve Buchanan arrived in Nashville as a freshman at Vanderbilt University and Jo Walker-Meador was at the midpoint of her long tenure as the executive director of the Country Music Association.
Exactly 40 years down the road, these three were honored by Leadership Music on Monday night (Nov. 16) at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum’s CMA Theater. Jo was presented with the inaugural Founding Council Award. Steve was given the Brian Williams Ambassador Award. Reba won the organization’s 10th Dale Franklin Leadership Award, its highest honor.
LM executive director Debbie Linn and board president Mike Craft welcomed the crowd, noting that LM is now in its 27th program year and has 1,028 alumni. Event co-chairs Erika Wollam-Nichols and Jeff Gregg explained the criteria for the three awards and thanked sponsors.
Host Hillary Scott, of Lady Antebellum, grew up in the Nashville music business as the daughter of Lang Scott and Linda Davis. “This feels a little bit like a family reunion,” she said. “No family reunion is complete without a strong woman to look up to. And that woman is Jo Walker-Meador.”
The executive took over the CMA when fewer than 100 stations were programming the genre. Today, country is a billion-dollar industry.
Alabama took the stage first. “If there’s ever been an angel in country music,” said lead singer Randy Owen, “it’s Jo Walker-Meador.” The group performed the beautifully written (by Becky Hobbs and Don Goodman) “Angels Among Us” in Jo’s honor.
Then Mac Davis offered “That’s Where Songs Come From.” Following a tribute video, Brenda Lee was endearing with her humor, candor, sincerity and drama.
“I’m here to celebrate the incredible gift to our industry that is Jo Walker-Meador,” said Brenda. “Jo literally rocked the cradle of an entire industry. She is the Matriarch of Music Row.”
Brenda said she performed her first show for the CMA in 1958 (when she was 13 years old). She delivered the emotional Sophie Tucker monologue from her old nightclub act, ending it by singing  “Unforgettable,” with customized lyrics. “Jo, thank you for making each of our lives richer.”
Garth Brooks presented the Founding Council Award. “I want to thank everyone for all the wonderful things they had to say,” said the 91-year-old Jo. “I think I’m getting far more credit than I’m due. I’m honored and flattered and pleased.”
Don Schlitz recalled his early days in Nashville working the graveyard shift as a computer operator at Vanderbilt University. Earlier in the evenings, he sang his songs at Phranks ‘n’ Steins on West End Avenue, then walked to work on campus accompanied by student fans Buchanan and Ken Levitan, then both freshmen.
The songwriter performed his newly written (with Josh Kear) “The Ryman.” Buchanan was instrumental in saving the historic venue when it was slated for the wrecking ball.
Following a tribute video, Nashville TV cast members took the stage. Buchanan is the show’s executive producer. Aubrey Peeples, Clare Bowen, Chris Carmack, spokesman Chip Esten, Sam Palladio and Jonathan Jackson, backed by Colin Linden, performed “A Life That’s Good” in Buchanan’s honor. Levitan and Callie Khouri presented the Brian Williams Ambassador Award.
“Brian made a difference,” said Buchanan. “Receiving this award in his name makes me feel I am not worthy. He was charming, sincere, loving and caring. I hope all of your souls will echo the way that Brian Williams’s and Dale Franklin’s do.” Amen, brother.
Hillary began the Reba portion of the eve by singing “Does He Love You” with Martina McBride. Hillary’s mother was Reba’s original vocal foil on the song. Following Reba’s tribute video, Trisha Yearwood rocked out on “Fancy.” Ronnie Dunn sang his ballad “I Keep on Loving You.” Reba’s son, race-car driver Shelby Blackstock, presented the accolade.
“Leadership is a great organization and a great mission to be on,” Reba said in accepting. “It’s important to leave something as you go. They say this award is about leading by example. This has been a wonderful night.”
A who’s-who of Music Row was there to offer numerous standing ovations. Several attendees appeared in the tribute videos, including the video-hilarious Jeannie Seely and Pete Fisher, plus Bill Denny, Joe Galante, Randy Goodman, Mary Ann McCready & Roy Wunsch, Tony Brown, Sarah Trahern, Bob Romeo and Shane McAnally.
During the cocktail hour, we supped on shrimp-and-grits skewers, marinated vegetables, sweet-potato gnocchi, flatbreads, quinoa salad and turkey, brie and cranberry biscuit sandwiches.
Marion Kraft, Marion Williams, Jody Williams, Sally Williams, Judy Harris, Judi Turner, John Zarling, John Esposito, Mike Vaden, Michael Martin, Martin Fisher, Bob Romeo, Bobby Tomberlin, Sherod Robertson and Ken Robold plus Sylvia, Stacy Schlitz, Susan Stewart, Doug Johnson, Diane Pearson, Daniel Miller, Dennis Lord, Dale Bobo and Donna Hughes mingled.
Ben Vaughn introduced me to young singer-songwriter Cale Dodds, from whom we expect great things. Cale has an online EP called Wild and Reckless. Labels, start your bidding.
Also working the room were such fabulons as Jim Ed Norman, Julie Boos, Justin Levinson, Jewel Coburn, Gene Ward, George Briner, Allison Brown Jones, Anita Hogin, Amy Kurland, Frank Bumstead, Ree Guyer Buchanan, Patsy Bradley, Lori Badgett, Scott Borchetta, Brett Wolcott & Lydia Lenker, Terry Hemmings, Clint Higham, Tim Fink, Regina Stuve, Peggy Whittaker, Suzanne Lee, Rick Murray, Neil Spielberg, Kos Weaver, Patrick Clifford, etc. etc. etc.
After all, Leadership Music is where the elite meet.